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Black Bean and Pork Chili

Black Bean and Pork Chili


Ground pork is used in this spicy delicious chili, but if you’d rather use ground beef, amp up the spices a tad and you’ll have everyone clamoring for refills. Serve in deep bowls and offer grated Cheddar, sour cream, chopped red onions, or chopped green scallions for toppings.

Ingredients

  • 2 medium yellow onions, minced
  • 2 Pounds lean ground pork or 10 percent fat beef
  • 2 Tablespoons vegetable oil (optional if meat has enough of its own fat)
  • 2 Tablespoons chili powder
  • 1/2 Teaspoon cayenne
  • 1 Cup original blend coffee, brewed
  • 1 8-ounce can of green chiles, chopped
  • 4 Cups black beans (if canned, rinse thoroughly)
  • 4 Cups canned beef or vegetable broth
  • 4 Cups water
  • 4 Cups grated Cheddar cheese
  • 2 Cups sour cream or plain yogurt
  • 1 Cup chopped scallions or minced red onion

Servings4

Calories Per Serving1743

Folate equivalent (total)956µg100%


Black Bean and Pork Chili - Recipes

I know. It's been, like, 8 months.

(Insert chagrined grin emoji.)

I nearly shut this thing down. No, really. But I couldn't pull the trigger! So here I am again. I missed you guys.

What's been going on? Well, Bruno turned two. Hugo learned how to read and write. In many ways, things are just fine. In other ways, though, the past year has been really difficult. Just life, you know? Nothing spectacular or out-of-the-ordinary. Mothering two young children, noodling forward in a marriage, trying to figure out my career, dealing with money issues. but to top it all off, I've recently been diagnosed with a string of stress-related health problems. I knew something was off last year already, but couldn't put my finger on it. This year, so far, my body has been telling me in no uncertain terms to spend a little more time saying no, putting myself first and finding peace.

Easier said than done! yelled a million mothers in exasperation as she skulked off to a corner to use her phone to meditate. (Insert eye roll emoji.)

It's been scary and humbling and also kind of nuts to witness my body manifest a lot of the crap that I do not do a good job of managing. And I'm kind of overwhelmed at how much willpower it takes to take care of myself. I feel like I'm a total champ at taking care of other people, so it's doubly weird to realize that I'm really failing at me. I'm sort of embarrassed by that. I'm also embarrassed about this paragraph! Let's move on.

Feeding the children has pretty much become a shit show. Hugo has the appetite of a small bird. Bruno is incredibly picky. (The only green thing he eats are spicy olives.) (THE ONLY GREEN THING.) (SPICY.) (MOTHERLOVING.) (OLIVES.) Every once in a blue moon, I throw my hands up and make alphabet noodle soup with a bouillon cube because it's Hugo's favorite thing to eat (insert exploding head emoji) and because Bruno will usually eat it too. But most of the time, I cook the food I want to eat (within reason, people) and then there's a lot of whining and uneaten food and smoke comes out of my ears and no matter what I've made, the meal always ends with Bruno eating chunks of Parmesan cheese.

(I read that in a lovely cookbook called Repertoire by Jessica Battilana - in a headnote about newborns and surviving and fattoush salad - last spring and spontaneously burst into tears because it was so profound and wise and right and also WTF why are children so difficult? I sometimes debate going around my house and taping pieces of paper with SURRENDER written on them to the walls. You know, just to remind me.)

Last year, I also discovered this chili from Melissa Clark's most recent cookbook called DINNER: Changing the Game (via Whoorl, but I can't remember in what context) and there were a few brief, shining evenings in which the children and Max and I all enjoyed eating it. Since then, Bruno has decided that ground meat is for the dogs and Hugo hates stew, but Max and I continue to think that this is an exceptionally delicious chili. (It's also a delight to make, which seems important if you derive some modicum joy from cooking, as most of us here do? I hope?) It has sage and beer in it, plus cheddar on top, and it's just really satisfying and wonderful. I'd call it my favorite chili.

Note: This post includes affiliate links and I may earn a commission if you purchase through these links, at no cost to you. I use affiliate links only for products I truly love and companies I trust. Thank you.

Melissa Clark's Pork and Black Bean Chili
From Dinner: Changing the Game
Serves 4 to 6

2 tbsp olive oil
1 large onion, diced
1 red pepper, diced
1 pound ground pork (or turkey)
2 tsp kosher salt, plus more if needed
1 tsp freshly ground black pepper
2 tsp dried oregano
1 tbsp minced fresh sage
1 tbsp chili powder, plus more if needed
2 minced garlic cloves
1 28-ounce can diced tomatoes
2 15-ounce cans black beans, drained and rinsed
1/4 cup lager (like Negra Modelo)
Grated cheddar or sour cream, for serving (optional)
Lime wedges, for serving

1. Heat the oil in a large pot over medium high heat. Add the onion and pepper cook, stirring, until the vegetables have softened and lightly browned, about 7  minutes. Add the pork and cook, breaking it up with a wooden spoon, until it is cooked, about 7 minutes. Stir in the salt, pepper, oregano, sage, chili powder and garlic and cook for 1 minute.

2. Add the tomatoes and their liquid, the black beans and the beer. Stir and bring the mixture to a boil. Then reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer until the mixture is slightly thickened, 30 to 40 minutes. Taste and add more salt and pepper if needed. Serve topped with grated cheese (or sour cream) and with the lime.

Comments

I know. It's been, like, 8 months.

(Insert chagrined grin emoji.)

I nearly shut this thing down. No, really. But I couldn't pull the trigger! So here I am again. I missed you guys.

What's been going on? Well, Bruno turned two. Hugo learned how to read and write. In many ways, things are just fine. In other ways, though, the past year has been really difficult. Just life, you know? Nothing spectacular or out-of-the-ordinary. Mothering two young children, noodling forward in a marriage, trying to figure out my career, dealing with money issues. but to top it all off, I've recently been diagnosed with a string of stress-related health problems. I knew something was off last year already, but couldn't put my finger on it. This year, so far, my body has been telling me in no uncertain terms to spend a little more time saying no, putting myself first and finding peace.

Easier said than done! yelled a million mothers in exasperation as she skulked off to a corner to use her phone to meditate. (Insert eye roll emoji.)

It's been scary and humbling and also kind of nuts to witness my body manifest a lot of the crap that I do not do a good job of managing. And I'm kind of overwhelmed at how much willpower it takes to take care of myself. I feel like I'm a total champ at taking care of other people, so it's doubly weird to realize that I'm really failing at me. I'm sort of embarrassed by that. I'm also embarrassed about this paragraph! Let's move on.

Feeding the children has pretty much become a shit show. Hugo has the appetite of a small bird. Bruno is incredibly picky. (The only green thing he eats are spicy olives.) (THE ONLY GREEN THING.) (SPICY.) (MOTHERLOVING.) (OLIVES.) Every once in a blue moon, I throw my hands up and make alphabet noodle soup with a bouillon cube because it's Hugo's favorite thing to eat (insert exploding head emoji) and because Bruno will usually eat it too. But most of the time, I cook the food I want to eat (within reason, people) and then there's a lot of whining and uneaten food and smoke comes out of my ears and no matter what I've made, the meal always ends with Bruno eating chunks of Parmesan cheese.

(I read that in a lovely cookbook called Repertoire by Jessica Battilana - in a headnote about newborns and surviving and fattoush salad - last spring and spontaneously burst into tears because it was so profound and wise and right and also WTF why are children so difficult? I sometimes debate going around my house and taping pieces of paper with SURRENDER written on them to the walls. You know, just to remind me.)

Last year, I also discovered this chili from Melissa Clark's most recent cookbook called DINNER: Changing the Game (via Whoorl, but I can't remember in what context) and there were a few brief, shining evenings in which the children and Max and I all enjoyed eating it. Since then, Bruno has decided that ground meat is for the dogs and Hugo hates stew, but Max and I continue to think that this is an exceptionally delicious chili. (It's also a delight to make, which seems important if you derive some modicum joy from cooking, as most of us here do? I hope?) It has sage and beer in it, plus cheddar on top, and it's just really satisfying and wonderful. I'd call it my favorite chili.

Note: This post includes affiliate links and I may earn a commission if you purchase through these links, at no cost to you. I use affiliate links only for products I truly love and companies I trust. Thank you.

Melissa Clark's Pork and Black Bean Chili
From Dinner: Changing the Game
Serves 4 to 6

2 tbsp olive oil
1 large onion, diced
1 red pepper, diced
1 pound ground pork (or turkey)
2 tsp kosher salt, plus more if needed
1 tsp freshly ground black pepper
2 tsp dried oregano
1 tbsp minced fresh sage
1 tbsp chili powder, plus more if needed
2 minced garlic cloves
1 28-ounce can diced tomatoes
2 15-ounce cans black beans, drained and rinsed
1/4 cup lager (like Negra Modelo)
Grated cheddar or sour cream, for serving (optional)
Lime wedges, for serving

1. Heat the oil in a large pot over medium high heat. Add the onion and pepper cook, stirring, until the vegetables have softened and lightly browned, about 7  minutes. Add the pork and cook, breaking it up with a wooden spoon, until it is cooked, about 7 minutes. Stir in the salt, pepper, oregano, sage, chili powder and garlic and cook for 1 minute.

2. Add the tomatoes and their liquid, the black beans and the beer. Stir and bring the mixture to a boil. Then reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer until the mixture is slightly thickened, 30 to 40 minutes. Taste and add more salt and pepper if needed. Serve topped with grated cheese (or sour cream) and with the lime.


How to Make It

Brown pork in a large pot over medium-high heat, turning occasionally, about 10 minutes, adding a little oil if pork is very lean. Transfer pork to a plate. Add bacon to pot and cook, stirring often, until browned but still soft, about 5 minutes. Spoon out fat and return 2 tbsp. to pot. Add onion and celery and cook, stirring often, until onion is translucent, about 5 minutes.

Return pork to pot and add beans, chipotles, cumin, broth, and 1/2 cup whiskey. Cover and bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce heat and simmer until beans and pork are tender, about 1 1/4 hours.

Stir in chorizo and remaining 1/4 cup whiskey. Simmer, covered, until flavors are blended, about 10 minutes more. Stir in parsley.


Black Bean And Pork Chili

Black Bean And Pork Chili… I guess this means it’s football season!

As I write this post, it’s August. It’s the middle of summer. It’s hot and it’s beautiful. So, why am I sitting here thinking of this Black Bean And Pork Chili?

And it’s not just chili, it’s everything fall related. I never ever feel like I’m wishing the days away or wishing for a season to end — I love the change of seasons — except maybe winter once March comes around. But, this week, all I want is chili and soup. And warming foods. Because, well… they really are the best foods…

So, here I am sitting outside on the deck, with the ocean breeze blowing and I’m ready for fall. Well, at least fall food.

Can it possible true that I’ve had enough guacamole and summer tacos?

Hmmm…. maybe it’s because warming spices are what my body needs right now. This is the rule I live by… if it’s healthy and I’m craving it, it must be because I need it. This chili has so many healing spices and seeds and other ingredients in it, so I’m going to go for it even in the middle of summer. If you’re now craving it too, I say go for it. You won’t believe how good this smells when it’s simmering on your stove. I’m in a beach community where you can literally reach out and touch the neighbor’s houses and I bet if I open the door while this chili is cooking, I’ll have lots of guests. Yes, even in August.

I make this chili with bone broth. This makes it extra delicious and extra healing. Read about 5 Reasons You Need To Add Bone Broth To Your Diet.

You can use any kind of beans you like in this chili, but In Chinese medicine, black foods are known as the best foods to strengthen the body and nourish the blood. We recommend them for many people who suffer from chronic lower back pain, knee pain and infertility. Black beans have the highest amount of antioxidants of any bean, they are high in fiber and are good for the heart… and they are delicious too!

If you are someone who has digestive issues be sure to download this free copy of my Healthy Digestive ebook now.

Here are some of the awesome healing ingredients in this Black Bean And Pork Chili:

In Chinese medicine, black foods are known as the best foods to strengthen the body and nourish the blood. We recommend them for many people who suffer from chronic lower back pain, knee pain and infertility. Black beans have the highest amount of antioxidants of any bean, they are high in fiber and are good for the heart.

Pork strengthens the digestive system, helps with constipation, and can moisten a dry cough and other dryness in the body. It’s also good to strengthen your qi and give you energy.

Bone broth is one of the most healing foods around. It’s good for digestion, skin, brain power, energy, and inflammation.

Hot peppers contain more vitamin C than any other vegetable and they are good at fighting off the common cold. So, if you like spice, as I do, use a generous amount of whatever hot peppers you like. And feel free to add more chili powders or spicier ones if you’re a spice-a-holic. The main component of hot peppers is capsaicin. Capsaicin actually works with your body and mind to make you feel happy. It’s also good for reducing swelling and can relieve arthritic joint pain. If you have high blood pressure, check with your doctor before eating too many hot peppers because they can actually raise the blood pressure in some people. Use as much or as little hot chili powders as you like in this recipe.

Raw cacao is a superfood. It is packed with magnesium, iron, zinc and other minerals. Not only is it packed with health benefits, but it actually has properties that help the body absorb nutrients better and it’s filled with antioxidants. Cacao can actually be translated as “food of the gods”… Raw cacao can help lower blood pressure, promote healthy heart function, improve digestion, and may even help increase the libido.

Turmeric is actually a Chinese herb (Jiang Huang). It is great for reducing inflammation throughout the body. If you suffer from aches and pains in your joints, try turmeric. It can help relieve menstrual pain and some other abdominal pains but, if you are pregnant, ask your doctor before you eat too much turmeric.

Bell peppers help with indigestion. If you are feeling bloated and full from over-eating a lot lately, consuming bell peppers will help reduce this feeling. They are also good for blood circulation and research has shown that they are good for people with a low appetite or anorexia. It used to be common in China to use green pepper tea to soothe indigestion. I used yellow bell peppers in this chili, but you can use whatever color you like.

Hemp seeds are a superfood. They are high in protein, easily digestible, and contain a full complement of amino acids. They contain disease-fighting phytonutrients that are good for your blood, immune system, tissues and skin. Hemp contains a specific fatty acid that acts as a powerful anti-inflammatory. It also helps balance hormones, making it a great choice to fight the symptoms of PMS. This super seed is also good for your liver and your brain.

Kale is everywhere these days. It is extremely nutritious, and because it to so popular you can find it already washed and prepared in lots of markets. Make sure you clean the kale leaves thoroughly and remove the center thick stems if they bother you (I don’t like to eat these think stems). This dark leafy green is a great source of fiber and calcium. It’s also rich in many minerals, including magnesium, iron and potassium. One serving contains 200% of the daily requirements of Vitamin C and 180% of Vitamin A.

In Chinese medicine, we use tomatoes to aid in digestion and to help detoxify the body. They are also good to combat excess cholesterol, lessen inflammation and curb asthma. Tomatoes can also quench thirst, and they can help fight some kidney infections.

Onions are great for your immune system they are a natural antihistamine. Recently, I recommended that a patient with bronchitis put sliced raw onions in her socks when she went to sleep… she woke up so much better. (I know I’ve told you this before, but it really is awesome!) Onion is a superhero in the food world!


This black bean stew is about layering flavours

Dry roasting the onion and garlic. The fire roasted tomatoes. Frying the onion mixture. That’s Rick Bayless.

He would be mad I didn’t use pork lard instead of oil. Sorry about that Mr. Bayless. Next time. I was out and the butcher was closed… But at least this black bean stew brings all those lessons into one big bowl of delicious.

Mexican pork and black bean stew is all about layering flavours. That’s what makes it work.

The deeply browned pork. The charred onions. Earthy black beans. A bit of acid from the fire roasted tomatoes. A bit more from the lime. Bright notes from the cilantro and jalapeño.

These are complex and satisfying flavours. Just good. Crowd pleasing. It’s a family favourite waiting to happen…


Directions

Cut the pork tenderloin into 1-inch cubes. Place in the bottom of the crock pot. Sprinkle the pork with the cumin, chili powder, and oregano. Add the onion and bell pepper on top.

Pour the salsa, black beans, and chicken broth over all.

Cover the crock pot and cook on low heat for 6-8 hours or until the pork is tender and cooked through.

Serve individual bowls of the chili with a dollop of sour cream on top.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 pound ground pork
  • 1 pound lean ground beef
  • 2 cups chopped white onion, 2 medium
  • 8 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 fresh habanero pepper, seeded and finely chopped (optional)
  • 1 tablespoon chili powder
  • ½ teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1 14.5 ounce can petite diced tomatoes
  • ½ cup orange juice
  • 2 ½ cups water
  • 3 15 ounce cans black beans, rinsed and drained
  • ½ cup golden raisins
  • 2 cups chopped mango
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon black pepper

In a 4- to 6-quart Dutch oven heat oil over medium-high heat. Add the pork and beef cook breaking into smaller pieces with a wooden spoon, until no longer pink. Drain fat. Stir in the onion, garlic and habanero, if desired cook and stir until onion is tender, about 5 minutes. Stir in the chili powder and allspice cook 1 minute. Stir in the undrained tomatoes, orange juice and 2 1/2 cups water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium-low. Simmer, covered, for 10 minutes. Stir in the beans and raisins. Simmer, covered for 10 minutes more. Remove from the heat and stir in the mango, cilantro, salt, and pepper.


Related Video

a very tasty chili. loved the big tender chunks of pork. i thought about cutting them up to make them bite size but you can easily break them up in the bowl with the side of your spoon. it was a bit like a stew, with the taste of chili. I cut the recipe in half because i don't have a lot of people to feed but used the full recipe amount of beans. i recommend you do the same. otherwise it's mostly pork. the recommended sides are a must as they really add nice flavors in the bowl.

Serve this at our annual Chili party. Very rich in flavor and more like a delicious chili stew. Has such a stimulating flavor. It is the best Chili in the world, I think.

Pretty tasty--though not as good as I would have expected given the bacon, sour cream, avocado extravagance that crowned the entire thing. I followed the suggestion of one of the other reviewers and replaced the 1/3 cup chili powder with 1 Tbsp. chili powder plus 2 Tbsp. minced chiles in adobo. The resulting base flavor was good, but it didn't penetrate the beans since they were added so late in the cooking process--next time I'll add them 30 min before the end--Iɽ rather risk them falling apart than have them be flavorless. I also would suggest cutting the pork into smaller chunks (1/2-inch, maybe?) and making sure to be really aggressive with the salt and pepper during the pork cooking step. Overall, it was a very solid chili, though this recipe does make an absurd amount of food.

Do not put too much store in this review. I didn't think a single cup of coffee would be that big of deal, but I hate coffee, and I could taste it in the chili. So I guess I'll go back to my tailgate chili that I made for years.

This is our "go-to" chili. Good depth of flavour - mix it up, it all works.

made this with ground pork and guanciale since that's what i had on hand. used ancho chile powder in much smaller amounts, added the bay leaves, a bit more onion and just a touch of brown sugar. i also added black beans and pinto beans. really delicious.

Excellent chili recipe. Do be sure and add the suggested accompaniments. They really take this dish from delicious to extraordinary!

Great little dish. Didn't know what to do on a Sunday and decided cooking some chili would alleviate this boredom. I switched a few things up: added half a red bell pepper I had sitting around, and a couple tablespoons brown sugar to slightly sweeten it. Used 2 lb pork shoulder, 1 can kidney bean and 1 can black bean. The next time around I'll probably be trying the 1 tablespoon chili powder with chipotle chilis suggestion.

This is exceptional chili but two major adjustments are strongly recommended: First reduce the amount of chili powder to a scant 1 TABLESPOON and secondly, add in 2 tablespoons (more if you like) of chopped "chipotle chilis in adobo sauce" to bring up the heat. Doing this gets you the deep, spicy chili flavor you want, without the risk of waaaaaaay over-salting the dish. I also recommend skipping the bacon part, and simply browning the pork in lard. Lard is often used in tex-mex cooking and gives it a great authentic flavor. Lastly, I think most cooks around here would automatically know to de-fat the the chili before adding the beans it's an absolute must with any pork chili and really *ENHANCES* the dish's flavor. Excess oil coats a person's tastebuds and really diminishes flavor of this kind of dish. The best (and easiest!) method I have found to do this is to carefully fold up a paper towel (or two) and dab the oil away from the surface. You'll be amazed how the oil will stick to the towel and the chili will remain in the pot, making de-fatting any sauce a cinch.

My employer first prepared this chili for a raft guide get together last winter. My employers run white water rafting trips (Rocky Mountain River Tours - raft trips dot com) on the Middle Fork of the Salmon out in Idaho and we had some butterfly cut filet mignon left over from the rivers season, which she substituted for the pork shoulder. Wow. So good. Filet makes for an expensive chile for a raft guide in the off-season so I've stuck with the pork every time I've prepared this. Yea - I've prepared it more than once. Very tasty.

This is, hands down, the best chile ever, but! I didn't read the part about NOT using real chile powder but rather substituting the chile powder type crap you can find in bulk in most supermarkets until after I had made my first batch. After visiting New Mexico last fall and tasting the incredible things they do with chile, it didn't even occur to me to use anything but real chile powder. I used real, New Mexico chile powder and it came out over the top good! If you have a delicate pallette, perhaps the chile powder type substance they sell in bulk, in supermarkets will work for you but if you appreciate chile the way I do, use the real stuff. I can't wait to try this with Passilla, Chamyo, or Hatch powder. It may take me the rest of the year to decide which combination is the best but I'm willing to sacrifice. This recipe, with real New Mexico chile powder is over the top.

I made this recipe for a chili cook off luncheon, and won first place. There were about 16 other contestants. The only thing I do differently is use black beans, because they seem to be easier on my families digestive system.

I realised late that I didn't have 1/3 cu. chili powder in house, so I substituted some ancho chile powder cut with onion powder in the mix. Also, instead of canned beans, I cooked some Rancho Gordo beans from scratch. Since the chili was to spend a couple of hours on the stove, the beans were ready in plenty of time. I used 1 1/2 cu. dried beans and ended up with just the right amount (Yellow Eyed Woman variety, but any chili-sized bean would work, I think). This batch turned out spicier than I would have liked, but has AMAZING depth of flavor. I will tweak the mix of spices next time, but think this recipe is an absolute winner. Definitely the base on which I will build my best red chili!

Took this to a camping trip with 10 families so doubled the recipe. We all had it for dinner, and then everybody had some again the next morning for breakfast with tortillas and eggs -breakfast burrito-style. Everybody asked for the recipe. Made a few modifications as advised by other reviewers: used beer instead of water, a little brown sugar, a couple of bay leaves. Huge hit.

Perfect for a foggy SF day. Just enough spice. The pepitas (toasted salted pumpkin seeds) & bacon really bring out smokey and earthy flavors of this chili! EXCELLENT!

This is hands-down my family's favorite chili recipe - it has just the right amount of spice and heat! I made slight changes - using left over pulled pork (which cut way down on the total time), subbing beef broth for the water, and using ancho chili powder (no cayenne on hand). It was such a hit, I'm making it this week for family and friends!

Delicious! I will definitely make this again!!

This was a huge hit! I skipped the coffee and added extra water to make up for the lost liquid and the chili still came out superbly. Reduce the chili powder if youɽ rather have a less potent taste, although I added a bit more and got rave reviews from a range of people. This is a keeper.

I was sort of disappointed by this recipe. I chose this because all of the reviews say how amazing it is and I just don't agree. By itself the tomato taste is quite strong. With additives- I used avocado sour cream and corn chips- it's pretty good but still nowhere near the best.

This is a jolt of Umami..so savory its almost too much flavour. Its like someone dumped a whole jar of Marmite (Vegemite/Cenovis) - go Goggle it - into the brew. This was made with Boston Butt as that was all the local supermarket had for a big pork joint. I used a pressure cooker to speed things along. I wouldn't change a thing. Now I know what all the raves were about. It must be that can of beef broth + coffee that makes the taste so intense. A keeper!

This is one of the best chili recipes that I have ever had! It was the big hit on Superbowl Sunday. It gets better after it sits for 2-3 days, and the bacon garnish takes it over the top! I trimmed most of the fat off the shoulder, and the flavor was still very rich, the meat tender. I made it quite spicy, and it was loved by all (sour cream helps tone it down a bit too). This one's a keeper. YUM!


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How to make easy but tasty black bean and pork chili

(WTNH)– September is National Family Meals Month! This is the best time to enjoy meals together.

Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist Jamie Lee McIntyre shows us an easy recipe you can put all the ingredients in one pot in the video above. Black bean and pork chili is on the menu!

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 clove garlic, chopped
  • 1 onion, scrubbed with vegetable brush under running water and chopped
  • 1 green bell pepper, scrubbed with vegetable brush under running water and diced
  • 1 red bell pepper, scrubbed with vegetable brush under running water and diced
  • 1 jalapeno pepper, scrubbed with vegetable brush under running water and finely diced
  • 2 cans (15 ounces each) black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 2 cans (15 ounces each) diced tomatoes
  • 1-lb. cooked, shredded pork1 can (15 ounces) canned corn, drained
  • 2 cups chicken broth or water
  • 3 tablespoons chili powder
  • 2 tablespoons ground cumin
  • 1 tablespoon black pepper
  • 1 can (8 ounces) tomato paste

Optional Toppings:

  1. Wash hands with soap and water.
  2. In a large pot over medium heat, warm oil. Add garlic and onion. Sauté over medium heat for about 5 minutes. Add green peppers, red peppers and jalapeno peppers and sauté for additional 2-3 minutes. Add black beans and tomatoes cook for 5 minutes. Add shredded pork.
  3. Add corn, chicken broth or water, chili powder, cumin, black pepper and tomato paste. Bring to a boil reduce to simmer and cook 10 – 15 minutes until fragrant. Serve with optional toppings, if desired.

For more recipes and tips on how to make time for family meals when everyone is so busy, you can head over to www.JamieLeeRDN.com.

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